Troy Deeney: A Man Whose Troubled Past Laid the Foundations for Present Success


In the last few years the Premier League has lost some natural leaders, many of whom have not been replaced. Liverpool are only just coming to terms with the loss of Gerrard; Manchester United have lost three pivotal figures in Gill, Ferguson and Vidic and Arsenal are still struggling to replace Adams and Vieira.  It’s likely that come the end of this season John Terry will walk away from a glittering career at Chelsea and yet another player from England’s golden generation will have ended their relationship with the Premier League.

Another London club and one who can’t compete financially with Chelsea have no such problem. Having secured Premier League survival and an FA Cup semi-final, Watford owe much of this season’s success to the leadership of duo Troy Deeney and Quique Sánchez Flores. Deeney was a goal scorer in an otherwise disappointing 2-1 defeat at Wembley but no one could accuse the Watford captain of underperforming.  In an interview with Soccer AM earlier this year Deeney opened up about his relationship with his boss:  “He’s a legend. You can talk to him about anything from the things at home that might be stressing you out to not having enough sleep to train properly”. Not many players are so open about enjoying such a relationship with their manager which makes speculation that the Spaniard may lose his job at the end of the season all the more bizarre.

If the manager is the leader off the pitch then Deeney more than fulfils that role on it. A vocal leader of men, his displays are at the very least full of effort. No one could accuse this guy of not living up to the job required.   Things were not always so bright for the Hornet’s number nine though. The lifelong Birmingham City fan grew up in Chemsley Wood eight miles out of the city centre.  At 14 he was expelled from school and left education at 16 with no GCSE’s. He began working as a brick layer before starting his professional football career at Walsall. In 2010 he signed for Watford for an eventual fee of £500,000.

In 2012 Deeney followed a path walked previously by his father who had spent various stints in jail. Troy was imprisoned for three months for his involvement in a brawl where he kicked a man in the head. Deeney describes his time inside as ‘the best thing that ever happened to him’ leaving with GCSE’s in Maths, English and Science. Above all else the he had a renewed sense of perspective.

Since then he hasn’t looked back and isn’t just Watford’s captain but their talisman. When it’s going well at Vicarage Road you can be sure Deeney is in the goals and assists. When they are struggling no one is more willing to roll up their sleeves and put a shift in. To describe Deeney merely as a hard worker is an insult to the goals record he has achieved this season and throughout his Watford career. Troy Deeney is a captain in every sense of the word. No one is more important to their team in an era where that is less and less the case in the Premier League.